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A COMBINED MUSICAL/DRAMA FOR CHOIRS
EASY TO LEARN, UPLIFTING, HAPPY SONGS, HUMOROUS DRAMA


ALLAN AND LINDA ENJOY A TRIP TO HAWAII
AND LEARN MANY THINGS ABOUT ITS GEOGRAPHY,
MISSIONARY OUTREACH, AMAZE-ING FACTS



     

Allan takes ONE piece of luggage …
But look at the amount
of luggage Linda takes!!!!




PROGRAM THEMES:
AMAZING HOLIDAY
AMAZING LOVE
AMAZING GRACE
AMAZING MUSIC
AMAZING FACTS
AMAZE-ING PINEAPPLE
AMAZING SUNSETS
AMAZING ARRIVAL


Order from
E-Mail: viola@pahl.ca
(Charges are only for paper, photocopy work, postage)






INFORMATION REGARDING THE MUSICAL/DRAMA ENTITLED

“GOD’S AMAZING ALOHA OF LOVE”


The material for this musical/drama was assembled by Viola Pahl who lives in White Rock, British Columbia, Canada (near Vancouver; two miles from the Canadian - U.S. border at Blaine, WA). Viola and her husband Fred are retired (Fred served as a Baptist minister for many years). In 1948, Viola contracted polio when she was seven months’ pregnant. She spent several weeks in an iron lung and has remained a paraplegic, using crutches and/or wheelchair. One of her special ministries has been writing: skits, fun poetry, plays, and books (which number seven). Although a paraplegic, Viola also worked from time to time as a secretary, and in later years, as an instructor in Business Administration at a college. She and her husband present innovative programs to community organizations and adult groups at various churches. A newspaper article write-up on Viola is under the link IRON LUNGS AND WHEELCHAIRS.

The steel guitar has a particular fascination for Viola, and she plays her double-neck steel guitar for many functions. She has attended the Hawaiian World-Wide Steel Guitar Association convention in Hawaii to hear the world’s best players. The more traditional type of hymns sounds beautiful on the Hawaiian guitar. Many secular Hawaiian songs have a captivating rhythm which will appeal to young and old alike. The lyrics of these songs have been re-written by Viola Pahl to suit a Christian context. Please feel free to contact Viola at the addresses shown below.

INTERESTING FACTS ABOUT HAWAII
HAVE BEEN COLLECTED FROM VIOLA PAHL’S FILES
AND THE INTERNET

FEEL FREE TO COPY THIS DRAMA,
BUT BECAUSE IT IS COPYRIGHTED, PLEASE DO NOT PUBLISH
(COPYRIGHT SEPTEMBER 2002 BY VIOLA PAHL)


VIOLA PAHL
#507 - 1480 FOSTER STREET
WHITE ROCK, BC, CANADA V4B 3X7
PHONE: (604) 538-8191
E-MAIL: viola@pahl.ca
WEBSITE: www.pahl.ca/fredandviola


Wherever possible, the source of the material has been indicated. However, some of the material came from a file collection of long ago and, unfortunately, authors/sources, etc. had not been noted.



SUGGESTIONS

1. PRELUDE
Instead of your regular prelude, why not play a tape of Hawaiian music? If you do not have a tape of this type of music, Viola may be able to help you out.

2. DRAMA
a. Characters: Two actors are required: a man (Allan) and a woman (Linda) acting as a married couple who are leaving on a vacation for Hawaii. If the Musical/Drama is presented by seniors, then the occasion for the vacation could be a fiftieth wedding anniversary; if younger adult groups present the program, the reason for the holiday could be a twenty-fifth wedding anniversary, or even a honeymoon. In Section One, the couple is wearing casual clothing before their trip to Hawaii. In the remaining sections, the couple wears typical Hawaiian attire.

b. Props: Eight suitcases - one small one for Allan; seven for Linda
Hawaiian clothing and leis for Linda and Allan
Two patio-type chairs and a small patio table are required for several of the scenes.
The couple will sip juice from tall colored glasses from time to time. If the glasses are colored, there need not be any liquid in the glasses - the audience will be none the wiser.
An outdoor patio umbrella if your platform has room for it.

c. Choir:
The choir would look nice dressed in Hawaiian clothing, plus leis.

3. NARRATION
At times, Linda and Allan are the designated speakers. At other times, a Narrator may be used. Or, more speakers can alternate in speaking the short snippets of information. A variety of voices gives opportunity for more participants and also keeps the audience interested. The information snippets are not designated in most instances as to the speaker/s - the choice will be yours.

4. ALTERNATIVES
This musical/drama is so designed that parts of it can be deleted without spoiling the effect. It will depend on the length of time you have as to the number of items you wish to use. Different songs than the designated ones can be used.

5. CHOREOGRAPHY - Notes from Viola Pahl:
I taught drama at a Christian school in Nanaimo, and we presented a Christmas program based on a Hawaiian theme. For one of the songs, we learned how to "sign language" a verse. It is amazing how "sign language" can look like the gestures in a hula dance. At the end of the program, various people were thanked for their help, and the principal of the school was given a tribute. These people were called to the platform, and following the tributes, they were adorned with a lei.

The pastor's wife of an Indonesian church in Vancouver choreographed body movements to fit some of the words, and this was most effective. There are many phrases in the songs which lend themselves to appropriate body movements by the group. The body movements should be done in the style of hula. I have visited several churches in Honolulu where they include in their services "Christian" hula. "How Great Thou Art" is one hymn which has been done so beautifully and worshipfully. Body movements should enhance, not distract from the message of the song. The movements were slow, meaningful, and respectful - none of the show-biz type hula was used. Doubtless there is someone in your group with the imagination to "choreograph" a few graceful motions to enhance at least one song.

6. LENGTH OF PROGRAM
There is probably much more program material than you may wish to use. I have deliberately printed a lot of information so that you can omit some of the material and chose the material which you think is interesting for your performers and audience.

7. CLOSING
Following the closing benediction, have some of your choir members walk down the aisles, shaking hands with people here and there, and saying, "Aloha."


COMMENTS:


All alternative lyrics were composed by Viola Pahl
Often, verses can be sung together without repeating the chorus each time.


          



OUTLINE OF PROGRAM FOR

"GOD'S AMAZING ALOHA OF LOVE"



OPENING COMMENTS

Narrator to Audience: A - LO - O - O - O - HA! (Those in your group who have been to Hawaii will be able to help the chairperson say it the way it is done in Hawaii.) Audience responds in like manner.


POEM

Aloha means "farewell to thee"; Aloha means "good-bye";
It means "until we meet again" Beneath the tropic sky.
Aloha means "good morning" And always to be true,
But best of all, Aloha means, "I'll always think of you."


CHOIR DRAMATIZES THE FOLLOWING POEM

"Aloha - What Does it Mean?"



ALOHA - WHAT DOES IT MEAN?


Since this song/poem is at the beginning of the program, here is a suggestion as to effectiveness: Have the women come down the aisle/s from the back of the auditorium and work their way to the platform as the poem progresses. The men are on the platform, along with the narrator of the poem. Each section of the poem is prefaced by the singing of the following phrase:

200

OPENING ALOHA:

Sing it three times: First by the ladies, next by the men, and then altogether. Use this participation at the beginning and the ending of the poem. In between the verses, the melodic phrase is sung once by everyone.

(Aloha by singers)
It's more than just an easy word for casual good-bye;
It's finer than a greeting, and it's sadder than a sigh;
It has the hurting poignancy, the pathos of a sob;
It's sweeter than a youthful heart's exquisite joyous throb.

(Aloha by singers)
It's all the tender messages that words cannot convey,
It's tears unshed, and longing for a loved one gone away;
It's welcome to Hawaii, and it's lingering farewell;
It's all the dear and silent things that lover's lips can tell;

(Aloha by singers)
It's woven into flower leis and golden Hawaiian songs;
It's frailer than a spider-web and strong as leather thongs.
It's fresh as dew on ginger blooms and older than the moon;
It's in the little lullabies that native mothers croon;

(CHOIR ALL TOGETHER)
IT'S SAID A HUNDRED DIFFERENT WAYS - IN SADNESS AND IN JOY,
ALOHA MEANS "WE LOVE YOU"
SO WE SAY "ALOHA OE."

(THE SINGERS THEN REPEAT THEIR THREE-FOLD ALOHA:
LADIES, MEN, ALTOGETHER)




SECTION ONE - AMAZING HOLIDAY


CHOIR: "HAPPINESS"

PRAYER: The Lord's Prayer in Hawaiian

THE LORD'S PRAYER IN THE HAWAIIAN LANGUAGE:
Do you have anyone brave enough to practice saying at least half
of The Lord's Prayer in Hawaiian?

E ko makou makua I loko o ka lani
Our Father which art in heaven
E kala mai hoi ia makou, I ka makou lawehala ana
And forgive us our debts
E hoanoia kou inoa
Hallowed be Thy name
Me makou e kala nei I ka poe I lawehala I ka makou
As we forgive our debtors
E hiki mai kou aupuni;
Thy kingdom come
Mai hookuu oe ia makou I ka hoowalewale ia mai
And lead us not into temptation
E maiamaia kou makemake ma ka honua nei
Thy will be done on earth
E hoopakele no nae ia makou I ka ino
But deliver us from evil
E like me ia I malamaia ma ka lani la
As it is in heaven
No ka mea, nou ke aupuni
For Thine is the kingdom
E haawi mai ia makou I keia la, I ai namakou no neia la
Give us this day our daily bread
A me ka mara, a meka hoonanma a mau loa, aku, Amene
And the power and the glory forever, Amen
PRONUNCIATION:
"A" as in "father"       "E" as in "rate"       "I" as "feet"       "O" as in "old"       "U" as "flute"


CHOIR: "ALOHA - LET'S SING"


NARRATOR: We are going to follow the vacation trip of Allan and Linda who are leaving to take a vacation in Hawaii. As the scene opens, they are just about ready to depart.

(Allan comes on stage with a small suitcase. He calls out):


ALLAN: Linda, are you coming? Time's running out. (He paces back and forth impatiently; keeps looking at his watch) Women! It takes them a millennium to get ready for a trip. Here I am - one suitcase - ready to go.

LINDA: (comes on stage, gasping for breath; carries two suitcases) Finally, Allan, I'm ready. (places suitcases down)

ALLAN: It's about time. Let me take the suitcases, and you can lock the door. (He picks up suitcases and staggers beneath the weight of them.) Linda! What have you got in these suitcases? And why TWO suitcases? All you need in Hawaii is a muu-muu!

LINDA: Sorry, Allan, but you'd have to be a woman to understand. (Allan starts to leave with suitcases) By the way, Allan, I have five more suitcases, so please come back for them.

ALLAN: You have what???? Can you tell me why you are taking SEVEN suitcases?

LINDA: It's very simple. I have three suitcases for my personal belongings, and I have four empty suitcases which I hope to fill up with lots of good things from Hawaii for our children and grandchildren. And then there's Aunt Mavis, Uncle Jim...

ALLAN: (interrupts) I've heard enough. Let's go. (shakes head ) No use arguing with a woman. (takes out suitcases and returns for the empty ones)

LINDA: (Exclaims with joy while Allan is out; he comes on stage in time to hear her last statement) Oh, I just can't wait to land in Hawaii! Balmy breezes, guitars playing love songs, beautiful leis, Macadamia nuts… Hawaii - here we come! (She exits as Allan speaks)

ALLAN: (grimly) Yeh - Hawaii, here we come. (Fumbles around in various pockets for credit card - holds it in the air) With all the shopping Linda has planned, no wonder they say, "Master Card - don't leave home without it!" (He goes off-stage for the remaining suitcases.)

NARRATOR: Friends, we are all going on a vacation - and we won't have to take any suitcases along. The choir will tell you all about it.

(When choir starts singing, Allan enters with the remaining empty suitcases and goes across the stage to the other exit.)

CHOIR: "WHEN I TAKE MY VACATION IN HEAVEN"
(First three verses only. The fourth verse is sung at the end of the program.)




SECTION TWO - AMAZING FACTS


Allan and Linda are now in Hawaii, sitting on patio chairs, with a small table in front of them with beverage glasses. They are wearing typical Hawaiian clothing plus leis. From time to time, Linda and Allan can pretend to be sipping pineapple juice through a straw. Allan is browsing through some travel folders.


CHOIR: "GOD'S AMAZING ALOHA" (Tune: "To You 'Aloha' from Waikiki")


LINDA: Oh, Allan, Hawaii is all that I imagined it to be and much more.

ALLAN: It's going to be difficult to go back home after the good time we're having. I've been looking through these travel brochures, and I've come across some very interesting facts about Hawaii. Listen: Hawaii is the most isolated population center on the face of the earth. It is over 2,000 miles from California; over 3000 miles from Japan; over 5000 miles from the Philippines, and nearly 5000 miles from China. There's more:

• From east to west, Hawaii is the widest state in the United States.

• In the 18th century, many imported animal species have had a negative effect on the islands. These are: goats, cattle, sheep, pigs, and black rats.

• Hawaii is the only State in the USA that grows coffee.

• Hawaii had no mosquitoes until 1826, which were dumped ashore as the sailors rinsed out water barrels.

• However, on the plus side - there are no mice, no deer, no raccoons, no buffalo, no giraffes, and best of all - NO SKUNKS!

HAWAII HOLDS THESE WORLD RECORDS:

• The wettest spot on earth is found in Hawaii.

• The world's largest wind generator is on the island of Oahu. The windmill has two blades 400 feet long on the top of a tower twenty stories high.

• On the island of Maui is the world's largest dormant volcano.

• On the Big Island of Hawaii, you will find the world's most active volcano - Kilauea.

• On the island of Molokai are the world's highest sea cliffs.

• The tallest mountain in the world, measuring from its base at the ocean floor, is found on the Big Island.


NARRATOR: After hearing about such awesome beauty in Hawaii, we are grateful that God, the creator of the world, is always with us.

CHOIR: "God's Presence" (Tune: "BEAUTIFUL LIHUE")


COMMENTS:

"GOD'S PRESENCE" (Tune: "Beautiful Lihue")
Inserted into the music for effect are several bars of a hula-type rhythm.
Sing the INSERT lines without musical accompaniment.
Point upward on
Stretch arms open on
Place hands across chest for
GOD'S ALOHA
HE TRULY LOVES
US

Have the Hawaiian information facts presented in a format of your choice:
a. Linda and Allan alternating;
b. Two people, other than Linda and Allan, alternating;
c. Depending on the size of your auditorium and availability of microphones,
various members of the choir could give out the facts.




SECTION THREE - AMAZING LOVE


Linda and Allen are sitting at the table.

ALLAN: Look, Linda, there's a wedding procession going down the street.

LINDA: Well, even though we didn't get married in Hawaii, I'm so grateful to our family for giving us this trip to celebrate our wedding anniversary. And you know what, Allan?

ALLAN: What?

LINDA: I love you with all my heart. Do you mind if I sing "The Hawaiian Wedding Song?"

CHOIR: "THE HAWAIIAN WEDDING SONG"

ALLEN: Thanks. I appreciate your sentiments more than words can tell. Well, (glances at watch) let's go to the restaurant and get one of those big pineapple fruit dishes. Pineapple never tastes as good at home as it does here. And tomorrow, we'll go to the Dole Pineapple Plantation and see if we can work our way through the world's largest maze. (They leave.)

COMMENTS:

Even though "Linda" may not be a solo singer, have her stand and "synch" the words as the choir sings. Or just have a soloist sing the song.




SECTION FOUR - A-MAZE-ING PINEAPPLE


NARRATOR: While our Hawaiian couple enjoy their fruit bowl, here are a few interesting facts about the Pineapple.

• More than one-third of the world's commercial supply of pineapples comes from Hawaii.

• No one is certain when pineapples were first grown in Hawaii, but historians believe that a Spanish shipwreck in 1527 on the South Kona coast on the Big Island of Hawaii brought tools, garments and plants, including pineapples, from Mexico to Hawaii.

• Approximately 27,000 to 33,000 plants are planted in an acre, and the work is all done by hand.

• The entire island of Lanai was purchased in 1922 by Jim Dole for $1.2 million - a huge sum of money in those days. For many years, this island was the heart of Dole's pineapple operations.

• In more recent years, however, high labor and transportation costs have made pineapple production uneconomic on this island paradise. By 1994, Dole ceased virtually all of its pineapple production on Lanai and moved it to Thailand and the Philippines.

• When Allan and Linda visit the Dole plantation, they will walk through the "World's Largest Maze" according to the 2001 Guinness Book of World Records. In the center of the maze is a huge pineapple. The maze covers an area of more than two acres with a path length of 1.7 miles. It is made of 11,400 colorful Hawaiian plants, including varieties of hibiscus, the official state flower. Allan and Linda are going to have a competition to see who will get through the maze first. And now the choir is going to remind us that God leads us out of the maze of despair when we focus our eyes on our beautiful Saviour.


CHOIR: "BEAUTIFUL JESUS" (Tune: "Hawaiian Sunset")

COMMENTS:

"Beautiful Jesus" to the tune of "Hawaiian Sunset"
After writing out the melody in the Key of D, a very poor copy of the song
in the Key of C was found. This copy is also appended, even though
there is no Bass Clef. It was written specifically for the steel guitar.
If you wish to use the Key of C, you can still have your choir
sing from the Key of D copy.





SECTION FIVE - AMAZING GRACE


NARRATOR: And now for more interesting trivia about Hawaii's religious past.

• When the missionaries arrived in Hawaii, the women wore little or no clothing. So the missionaries designed the long, full-flowing muu-muu, and we all agree that it is a most comfortable garment.

• The Hawaiians had often seen white men, but the sight of white women was new to them, so when the missionary women came to Hawaii, Samuel Kamakau described it thus:

• ...the people came in crowds, men, women, and children, and exclaimed over the pretty faces of the white women, their deep-set eyes, their bonnets that jutted forward, their long necks which won for them the name "Long Neck." Crowds gathered, and one and another exclaimed: 'How white the women are...what long necks...but pleasing to look at...what pinched-in bodies...what tight clothing above and wide below.'"

• Before the missionaries came, music was a chant, not singing as we know it today. Most of the beautiful Hawaiian music is because of the influence of Christian music. The Hawaiian word for "music" comes from the root word "hymn."

• Living quarters for missionaries were not of Hilton Hotel comfort. One of the missionary ladies, Lucy Thurston, described her Hawaiian home:

…our home was an abode of the most uncouth and humble character. It was a thatched hut, with one room, having two windows made by cutting away the thatch. On the ground for the feet was first a layer of grass, then a covering of mats.

• Here was one way to find a wife in a hurry. The American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, an interdenominational body, composed mostly of Presbyterians and Congregationalists, organized a mission to the Hawaiian Islands. Before the mission could sail, wives had to be obtained for the six bachelors in the party. Within the space of two months, brides were found and marriages performed. This missionary group consisted of the following, plus their wives:

Two ordained ministers; a physician; two teachers; a printer; a farmer; four Hawaiians.

It took them five months to reach Hawaii - as they went from Boston via the Cape Horn route to the Pacific Ocean.

• We may wonder why a printer was chosen to go to Hawaii. Printing began in 1822 in Hawaii, and soon the Hawaiians could see their own words in print. In 1826, Christian missionaries converted the Hawaiian language into a written alphabet which consisted of only TWELVE letters: 7 consonants and 5 vowels. By May 1839, the entire Bible had been translated and printed in the Hawaiian language.

• The earliest school buildings were nothing more than grass huts with a few mats laid over a dirt floor. The strategy of the missionaries was to bring the king and chiefs to conversion, for then the people would follow their leaders. This would not be an easy task. For example, the king would have had to give up four of his five wives and abstain from drinking rum. "No way," said the king!"

• In the Bible we read about the Cities of Refuge. Amazingly, before the Hawaiians had any knowledge of the Bible, they also had cities of refuge on the Big Island. These were established as havens for lawbreakers and for those vanquished in war.

• It is sad to note that before the white man came to Hawaii, drunkenness was unknown because there were no alcoholic beverages. It was one culture which had not discovered the laws of fermentation.

CHOIR: "AMAZING GRACE"

Allen and Linda re-enter stage and sit down

ALLAN: Wasn't that just the best-tasting pineapple in the world? And to think you got through the maze two minutes ahead of me! You're one smart gal. Now, let's hear about your research on the Christian faith in Hawaii.

LINDA: (holds up booklet) Here's what I found out. The first group of American missionaries arrived in Honolulu in 1820 from New England. The missionaries brought a mission house with them, a pre-fabricated building that still stands today. It is the oldest wooden structure on the islands.

ALLAN: And because Christianity became a dominant faith in the islands, Christianity was declared to be the national religion of Hawaii. And if you think that coffee seems to be the national drink of Hawaii, blame the missionaries. They introduced the coffee tree to the islands.

LINDA: I hope we can visit some of the interesting churches, Allan. I understand that the Kawaihao Church in Honolulu is constructed of giant coral slabs, and the cemetery out back is where many of the Islands' earliest missionaries are buried. If we get to the Big Island, one of the churches there is built of lava rock. The walls of the church are painted with a series of biblical scenes because in earlier years, native Hawaiians couldn't read. Hawaii's first Christian church is in Kona. Another interesting church is on the island of Hawaii. And on the island of Kauai is an old Lutheran Church. German immigrants to the area designed the interior to look like the ship that brought them there. The floor slants like the deck of a ship, the balcony looks like a captain's bridge, and there are ship lanterns hanging from the ceiling.

CHOIR: "CLEANSE ME"

COMMENTS:

"CLEANSE ME"
The opening verse to this hymn is from the song "Now Is the Hour"

"AMAZING GRACE'
Sing the first verse of this hymn, and then with modulating chords,
lead into a second hymn with the theme of "grace"
(choose either "Wonderful Grace of Jesus"
or "Grace Greater Than Our Sin")
These hymns can be found in a hymnal.



SECTION SIX - AMAZING SUNSETS


ALLAN: Look, Linda - look at the gorgeous sunset. The sun seems to glow brighter and bigger in Hawaii. I'm going to miss these sunsets.

LINDA: The most precious sunset of all will be when we are ushered into the presence of the Lord.

CHOIR sings several selections:
Choose one or more of the following "sunset" hymns:
"OVER THE SUNSET MOUNTAINS"
"SUNSET DAYS"
"BEYOND THE SUNSET"

"BEYOND THE REEF" (Suitable as a solo)


The picture above is a
Hawaiian sunset



The picture above is a sunset view
from Fred and Viola Pahl's condo
in White Rock, BC, Canada
THERE IS BEAUTY EVERYWHERE IN GOD'S CREATION



SECTION SEVEN - AMAZING MUSIC


LINDA: Well, Allan, it's our last night here. I will never forget this vacation.

ALLAN: Nor will I. I love the melody of the song "Bali Ha'i" and the words are so poignant: "Bali Ha'i may call you any night, any day. In your heart, you'll hear it call you: 'Come away, Come away.'" After I get home, I think I will hear a call wafting on the breeze to "Come away, Come away to Hawaii."

LINDA: It's a great melody, Allan, and I composed some special words to this song. Listen:

CHOIR: "JESUS CALLS"


LINDA: I have enjoyed hearing the Hawaiian steel guitar so much. What a shame that there are so few people playing it any more. Some of the stories connected with the ukelele and the steel guitar are fascinating.



NARRATOR: One would think that any research on the Hawaiian guitar would be done by someone of Hawaiian ancestry. Not so. A Vancouver lady named Lorene Ruymar was a music teacher in the public school system. She is a skilled steel guitar player and, along with her husband, plays professionally for many events. In 1996 Lorene published a 200-page comprehensive book on "The Hawaiian Steel Guitar and its Great Hawaiian Musicians." We are proud of our local talent! As you know, the Hawaiian steel guitar is so called because the notes are made by using a steel which is held in the left hand, and the right hand plucks the strings with picks on the finger.

Neither the steel guitar nor the ukelele originated with the Hawaiian people. The ukelele was a Portuguese instrument which was brought to the Islands. In the 1870's, a British officer named Purvis retired in Hawaii. Because of his miniature size and lively ways, the natives called him "Little Flea." He became an expert on this Portuguese stringed instrument. When he played it, it reminded the natives of a flea hopping, so they gave the instrument the same name: UKELELE which means "Little Flea."

The origin of the steel guitar is attributed to Joseph Kekuku. He had his guitar on his lap, and when he opened a parcel, a pocket knife fell out of the package and struck the strings. He noted that the tone produced by the steel knife produced a tone much better than any of the other objects with which he had experimented. In 1988, a proclamation was issued in Hawaii to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the steel guitar.

NOTE: The following stories are all very good, but if time prevents you from using all the material, it is suggested you use Sol Hoppii's story because he was very well known in years past for his involvement in Christian ministries.


BILLY HEW LEN:
Viola Pahl, the author of this musical, plays a Hawaiian steel guitar. In the 1970s she came across a gentleman named Billy Hew Len playing a steel guitar in a shopping mall. Little did Viola know what a special person Billy was. He was one of 12 children. When he was ten years old, he started to play his cousin's guitar. At age 17, tragedy struck. He was using a planing machine, and due to an accident, his left hand was cut off at the wrist. The stark realization that he would never play the steel guitar again devastated Billy. An elder in the Mormon Church, who worked with handicapped people, invented a sort of glove that would fit over the wrist. A machine shop made a special steel bar which was attached to the glove. After much patience and perseverance, Billy Hew Len again played the steel guitar and became one of Hawaii's outstanding steel guitar players. Viola's great regret is that she did not know the facts surrounding Billy Hew Len until after she had met him.

BENNIE NAWAHI
In TIME magazine July 31, 2000, there was a fascinating story about Bennie Nawahi. He was born in 1899. As a teenager, he played for pennies in the parks of Honolulu, often teaming up with Sol Hoopii - I'll talk about Sol just a little later. When Bennie was 36 years old, he suddenly went blind and never regained his sight. Nonetheless, he kept on playing for the next 40 years in nightclubs and restaurants. How Bennie did it is a marvelous feat.

SOL HOOPII
Finally, there is Sol Hoopii - born in 1902, the first of 21 children and a musical genius at the age of three. He became famous in Hollywood in his early twenties. Those of us who are of a very mature age will remember the name of movie actress Mary Pickford. When she had to play a scene requiring her to cry, she would insist on Sol's steel guitar playing to give her the proper emotion. (Viola Pahl makes this comment: "I can bring tears to people's eyes, too, when I play my steel guitar, but theirs are tears of anguish because of the horrible way I play.") At age 36, Sol came in contact with the Christian community, and for the remainder of his short life - he died at age 51 - he dedicated his talent to the Lord's work. The next song was one of Sol's favourites.

CHOIR: "THE NAIL-SCARRED HAND"

SING OR RECITE THE HYMN: "A NAIL IN HIS HAND"


LINDA: In 24 hours, we'll be back home again. Even though we're getting older, there are still a lot of challenges awaiting us. But we look forward to a better land than Hawaii - a land where we'll never grow old. (They exit platform.)

CHOIR: "NEVER GROW OLD"


NARRATOR: The Hawaiian vacation is just about over. As they leave Hawaii, Linda and Allan are touched by the sentiments expressed in the following songs which convey such warmth and love.

CHOIR: "MAY THE GOOD LORD BLESS AND KEEP YOU"
"ALOHA/HE'S COMING SOON"

COMMENTS:

"THE NAIL-SCARRED HAND"
In order to sing this song with more of a Hawaiian rhythm, try using the timing in the hand-written copy of the song which uses 3/4 time instead of 4/4 time.

"A NAIL IN HIS HAND" (Sing as a solo, or recite as a poem.)

"MAY THE GOOD LORD BLESS AND KEEP YOU"
Rather than using the word "fortune," use the word "blessings" in the line
"May your troubles all be small ones,
And your blessings (fortune) ten times ten…"
Inserted into this song for effect are segments of the hymn
"GOD BE WITH YOU"
It is suggested that the inserted phrases be sung with a variation:
such as a solo, duet, ladies' voices only ,or men's voices only.
You can, of course, leave out the inserted GOD BE WITH YOU.



SECTION EIGHT - AMAZING ARRIVAL


Linda and Allan have arrived home. They still have their Hawaiian clothing and leis on. Allan comes first onto the platform with two heavy suitcases. Plunks them down with a sigh of relief. He goes out for the other suitcases. There should be a small end table nearby on which there is lying an envelope.

CHOIR:
sings fourth verse of "WHEN I TAKE MY VACATION IN HEAVEN"
while Allan brings in suitcases.



ALLAN: Whew! I'll never understand the mind-set of women when they get to the International Market place in Honolulu. But - I have to admit, Linda knows a good bargain when she sees one. (sighs) Now we're home, and I won't have to think of shopping expeditions for a long, long time.

LINDA: (enters platform; waves arms in delight) We're home! We're home! Hawaii was great, but there really is no place like Home, Sweet Home! Look, Allan, (waves store circular) it's 15% discount day at Zellers. We're lucky to be home early enough in the day to take advantage of the bargains. I'll go and change so we can get to the store before closing time. (she starts to exit)

ALLAN: (waves arms in despair) SHOPPING???? I don't believe it!

LINDA: (She calls back to him) I'll even buy you a Hawaiian pineapple for dessert! (she exits)

ALLAN: (Picks up a business envelope) Ah - I'm sure going to need this one. My pension cheque has arrived. Unfortunately, Linda has plans for it. (Steps forward and addresses the audience.)

Oh - I almost forgot about you - thank you everyone for listening to our stories of Hawaii. Now it is time to say farewell - A - LO - O - O - HA to all of you. And you know what? (waves pension cheque envelope and speaks to it) Since Linda's taking me shopping again, it's ALOHA to you, too! (kisses envelope good-bye and exits)

CHOIR and audience sing: "HE'S COMING SOON"
Remind the audience that the original melody was written by a Hawaiian Queen.

COMMENTS

Following the singing of the foregoing hymn, have the choir members
leave platform and go down the aisles, shaking hands and saying ALOHA
to as many people as possible.

"HE'S COMING SOON" (Tune: "Aloha")
In order to have this song with more of a Hawaiian effect,
a hand-written copy of the song is appended which uses 3/4 time instead of 4/4 time.
Like "THE NAIL-SCARRED HAND" this song has more of a Hawaiian rhythm if it is sung to 3/4 time.
Appended is a sample copy with 3/4 time from a teaching lesson for the steel guitar.

Please contact Viola Pahl
viola@pahl.ca
for copies of music and lyrics











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